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KL Auschwitz-Birkenau
 All over the world, Auschwitz has become a symbol of terror, genocide, and the Holocaust. It was established by Germans in 1940, in the suburbs of Oswiecim, a Polish city that was annexed to the Third Reich by the Nazis. Its name was changed to Auschwitz, which also became the name of Konzentrationslager Auschwitz.

The direct reason for the establishment of the camp was the fact that mass arrests of Poles were increasing beyond the capacity of existing "local" prisons. Initially, Auschwitz was to be one more concentration camp of the type that the Nazis had been setting up since the early 1930s. It functioned in this role throughout its existence, even when, beginning in 1942, it also became the largest of the death camps.
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APPEAL

Let us build memory! Donate any documents and other historical items in your possession to the Auschwitz Memorial

Memory is not something that is acquired once and stays on forever. The moment that the last eyewitnesses and survivors pass away, we have to work together to build on that which remains: the testimonies of those former prisoners and the authentic artifacts connected with Auschwitz. Each item can have its own enormous meaning and should find its place in the collection of the Auschwitz Memorial. Here, it will be preserved, studied, and displayed. Its place is here.

   ELŻBIETA CAJZER - DZIAŁ ZBIORÓW

   THE OFFICE FOR INFORMATION ON FORMER PRISONERS

THE DATA BASE WITH PARTLY PRESENTED DATA ABOUT AUSCHWITZ PRISONER

 
On-line lesson: "Auschwitz — Concentration and Extermination Camp"

"Auschwitz — Concentration and Extermination Camp" online lessonThe "Auschwitz — Concentration and Extermination Camp" online lesson, which focus closer on the most important topics in the history of the Nazi German camp, is available in English on the Museum's website. The Auschwitz Museum is a pioneer of  e-learning in institutions of this kind in Poland.

GO TO THE LESSON

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Poles in Auschwitz
 After the liquidation of the Polish state and its institutions, the fundamental goal of German policy in occupied Poland was the exploitation of material and labor resources, and the removal of the local Polish population and ethnic minorities. This was done through expulsion and systematic extermination. The Polish lands were to be completely germanized, through German settlement in the depopulated area.
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Jews in Auschwitz
 Until early 1942, the Nazis deported to Auschwitz only a relatively small number of Jews, who were sent there along with the non-Jewish prisoners, mostly Poles, who accounted for the majority of the camp population until mid-1942.
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